Vitamin C and Vitamin E Sources

by admin_gothkm8c

Vitamin C is an essential vitamin that must be consumed in diet. Good sources include fresh fruits and vegetables, especially citrus fruits.

Vitamin C is needed for body development and functions. It plays important role in immune functions. Most experts recommend getting vitamin C from diet rather than supplements.

Vitamin C is used to treat scurvy. Today, most people use vitamin C for preventing and treating common cold. Vitamin C benefits include protection against immune system deficiencies, cardiovascular disease, prenatal health problems, eye disease and even skin wrinkles.

Vitamin C has received a good attention with good reason. Mark Moyad, MD, MPH, of the University of Michigan says, “Higher blood levels of vitamin C may be the ideal nutrition marker for overall health.”

Benefits of Vitamin C:

  1. It helps make collagen
  2. It acts as an anti-ager
  3. It boosts bone mineralization
  4. It could help manage blood pressure
  5. It is neuro-protective
  6. It may improve iron absorption
  7. It could reduce risk of chronic diseases

Daily Recommended Intake:

According to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, recommended daily vitamin C level is;

Age

Male

Female

Pregnant

Lactating

0-6 months

40mg 40mg

7-12 months

50mg

50mg

1-3 years

15mg

15mg

4-8 years

25mg

25mg

9-13 years 45mg

45mg

14-18 years

75mg 65mg 80mg

115mg

19+ years 90mg 75mg 85mg

120mg

Smoker Individual who smokes require 35mg/day more vitamin C than nonsmoker. Smoker need 35mg extra vitamin C, because smoking depletes vitamin C. 

Food Sources of Vitamin C:

Foods that contain high amount of vitamin C, citrus fruits, tomatoes, potatoes are the major vitamin C source in American diet. Other food sources are kiwifruit, green peppers, broccoli, strawberries, brussels sprout, and cantaloup. Although vitamin C also present in grains, it is added in fortified cereals.

Fruits with highest source of vitamin C include:

  • Lemon
  • Orange
  • Grapes
  • Grapefruit
  • Citrus fruits
  • Cantaloup
  • Kiwi fruit
  • Papaya
  • Mango
  • Pineapple
  • Strawberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cranberries
  • Raspberries
  • Watermelon

Vegetables with highest source of vitamin C include:

  • Broccoli
  • Brussel sprout
  • Cauliflower
  • Green and red peppers
  • Spinach
  • Cabbage
  • Turnips
  • Sweet and white potatoes
  • Tomato and tomato juice
  • Winter squash
  • Other green leafy vegetables

The best food sources of vitamin C are uncooked and raw vegetables and fruits. Cooking and storing food for longer period of time may reduce the vitamin C content. Microwaving and cooking more than needed also reduce vitamin C content.

Vitamin C content in following foods:

Foods

Mg per serving

Red pepper, ½ cup

95mg

Orange juice, ¾ cup

93mg

Orange, 1 medium

70mg

Grapefruit juice, ¾ cup

70mg

Kiwifruit, 1 medium

64mg

Green pepper, ½ cup

60mg

Lemon 1

53mg

Broccoli, cooked, ½ cup

51mg

Strawberries, fresh, ½ cup

49mg

Brussels sprout, cooked, ½ cup

48mg

Grapefruit, medium

39mg

Broccoli, raw, ½ cup

39mg

Tomato juice, ¾ cup

33mg

Cantaloup, ½ cup

29mg

Cabbage, cooked, ½ cup

28mg

Cauliflower, raw, ½ cup

26mg

Potato, baked, 1 medium

17mg

Tomato, raw, 1 medium

17mg

Spinach, cooked, ½ cup

9mg

Green peas, frozen, cooked, ½ cup

8mg

Vitamin E:

A nutrient that the body needs in small amount to stay healthy and for working of our body. Vitamin E is important for brain, eyes, skin, reproduction and for healthy blood. Vitamin E was discovered by Evans and Bishops in 1922. In 1930s it revealed the structure and biological function of Alpha-tocopherol. In 1940s Filler and other demonstrate that Vitamin E protect tissue from oxidation.

Vitamin E is fat soluble, which means it absorb and move through the body to fat. It is stored in liver and fatty tissues and is used when needed.

Vitamin E is a nutrient that perform as an anti-oxidant in body. It exists naturally in certain foods. It exists in 8 chemical forms, but Alpha-tocopherol is the best to meet dietary requirements of human.

Anti-oxidants protect body from free radicals. Free radicals cause heart disease, cancer and some other diseases. Vitamin E deficiency cause nerve pain (neuropathy). It also enhances Immune functions.

Eating vitamin E in foods is not risky, but high doses of vitamin E by supplements
(alpha-tocopherol supplements) might increases the risk of bleeding in brain (hemorrhagic stroke).

Health Benefits of Vitamin E:

  • May slow aging process
  • Boost immune system
  • May improve memory
  • Protect eyes
  • Improve blood vessels health
  • Reduce PMS (premenstrual symptoms)
  • Prevent skin from UV damage and sunburn
  • Give shine to hairs
  • Prevent from cardiovascular diseases
  • Reduce risk of certain cancers

Recommended Daily Intake of Vitamin E:

Age

Male Female Pregnant

Lactating

0-6 months

4mg

4mg

7-12 months

5mg

5mg

1-3 years

6mg

6mg

4-8 years

7mg

7mg

9-13 years

11mg

11mg

14-18 years

15mg

15mg

19+ years

15mg 15mg 15mg

19mg

Food sources:

  • Wheat germ oil
  • Sunflower oil
  • Safflower oil
  • Soybean oil
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Almonds
  • Peanuts, peanut butter
  • Beet greens, Collard green, Spinach
  • Pumpkin
  • Red bell pepper
  • Asparagus
  • Mango
  • Avocado
  • Atlantic salmon
  • Hazelnuts
  • Pine nuts
  • Kiwifruit
  • Turnip green
  • Mustard green

Vitamin E content in following foods;

Foods

mg per serving

Wheat germ oil, 1 tablespoon

20mg

Sunflower seeds, 1 ounce 

10mg

Almonds, 1 ounce

7.3mg

Hazelnut oil, 1 tablespoon

6.4mg

Sunflower oil, 1 tablespoon

5.6mg

Almond oil, 1 tablespoon

5.3mg

Hazelnuts, 1 ounce

4.3mg

Pine nuts, 1 ounce

2.7mg

Peanuts, 1 ounce

2.4mg

Atlantic salmon, half a fillet

2mg

Red pepper, 1

1.9mg

Brazil nuts, 1 ounce

1.6mg

Mango, half

1.5mg

Turnip greens, 1 cup

1.6mg

Kiwifruit, 1

1mg

Pistachios, 1 ounce

0.8mg

Beet greens, ½ cup

1.3mg

Broccoli, cooked, ½ cup 

1.1mg

Butternut squash, cooked, ½ cup

1.3mg

Mustard green, cooked, ½ cup

1.3mg

Cotton seed oil, 1 tablespoon

4.8mg

Rice bran oil, 1 tablespoon

4.4mg

Grapeseed oil, 1 tablespoon

3.9mg

Canola oil, 1 tablespoon

2.4mg

Palm oil, 1 tablespoon

2.2mg

Safflower oil, 1 tablespoon

4.6mg

 

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